What's My Charge? A Misdemeanor? A Felony?

Personal Injury and Criminal Defense in Dallas, Texas

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Tue, 08/04/2015

You were just released from jail on bond. A couple nights (or even hours) ago, you were arrested. What happens next?

 

First of all, you need to call an attorney. The legalese of the process can be very complicated, and it’s our job to make it easier on you. You may even want to call an attorney after you’ve been arrestYou were just released from jail on bond. A couple nights (or even hours) ago, you were arrested. What happens next?

 First of all, you need to call an attorney. The legalese of the process can be very complicated, and it’s our job to make it easier on you. You may even want to call an attorney after you’ve been arrested- especially if your bond (or the money you have to pay to be released) is set higher than you, or anybody, could reasonably pay.

 

 Next, you need to figure out what you have been charged with. While you probably know the offense (what they arrested you for), it’s often trickier to know what kind of charge you’re facing- is it a misdemeanor or a felony?

 

 The reason this can be tricky is because some offenses, like possession and DWI, can be either a misdemeanor or a felony. For instance, your third DWI charge is considered a felony, but the first two are misdemeanors. Possession of marijuana is another example- under 4 ounces is a misdemeanor, over 4 and it’s a felony.

 

 

In some counties like Dallas, it’s very easy to know which one you’re charged with. Your case number, which is listed on your bond papers and often on the contract with your attorney, will have either an “F” or an “M” in front- F for felony and M for misdemeanor.

 If that number starts with an “M”, it’s often followed by either an “A”, “B”, or “C.” That second letter represents what is called the Misdemeanor Class. Class A is the most serious, and Class C is the least serious. Your first DWI charge is a Class B (MB), and your second is a Class A (MA). After that, it’s a felony. Going back to possession of marijuana- 2oz or less is a Class B offense, 2-4oz is a Class A. Anything over that is a felony.

You were just released from jail on bond. A couple nights (or even hours) ago, you were arrested. What happens next?

First of all, you need to call an attorney. The legalese of the process can be very complicated, and it’s our job to make it easier on you. You may even want to call an attorney after you’ve been arrested- especially if your bond (or the money you have to pay to be released) is set higher than you, or anybody, could reasonably pay.

 

Next, you need to figure out what you have been charged with. While you probably know the offense (what they arrested you for), it’s often trickier to know what kind of charge you’re facing- is it a misdemeanor or a felony?

 

The reason this can be tricky is because some offenses, like possession and DWI, can be either a misdemeanor or a felony. For instance, your third DWI charge is considered a felony, but the first two are misdemeanors. Possession of marijuana is another example- under 4 ounces is a misdemeanor, over 4 and it’s a felony.

 

In some counties like Dallas, it’s very easy to know which one you’re charged with. Your case number, which is listed on your bond papers and often on the contract with your attorney, will have either an “F” or an “M” in front- F for felony and M for misdemeanor.

 

If that number starts with an “M”, it’s often followed by either an “A”, “B”, or “C.” That second letter represents what is called the Misdemeanor Class. Class A is the most serious, and Class C is the least serious. Your first DWI charge is a Class B (MB), and your second is a Class A (MA). After that, it’s a felony. Going back to possession of marijuana- 2oz or less is a Class B offense, 2-4oz is a Class A. Anything over that is a felony.

 

Just like misdemeanors, there are different kinds of felonies. There are five types in Texas- State Jail, 3rd degree, 2nd degree, 1st degree, and Capital. State Jail is the least serious and Capital (usually reserved for very serious crimes like murder) is the most serious.

 

When we said a 3rd DWI offense was a felony, it is more specifically that 3rd degree type. Any DWI after that is also a 3rd degree felony. Back to the marijuana example- simple possession between 4oz and 5lbs is a State Jail offense, 5-50lbs is a 3rd degree, 50-2000 lbs is a 2nd degree, and over 2000lbs is a 1st degree felony. You can’t be charged with a capital felony for possession of marijuana (or a DWI).

 

So what do these types of felonies and misdemeanors mean? Check out the next post t see!

If you or someone you love has been charged with a crime, call The Cochran Firm-Dallas, P.L.L.C. We can help.

 

 Just like misdemeanors, there are different kinds of felonies. There are five types in Texas- State Jail, 3rd degree, 2nd degree, 1st degree, and Capital. State Jail is the least serious and Capital (usually reserved for very serious crimes like murder) is the most serious.

 

 When we said a 3rd DWI offense was a felony, it is more specifically that 3rd degree type. Any DWI after that is also a 3rd degree felony. Back to the marijuana example- simple possession between 4oz and 5lbs is a State Jail offense, 5-50lbs is a 3rd degree, 50-2000 lbs is a 2nd degree, and over 2000lbs is a 1st degree felony. You can’t be charged with a capital felony for possession of marijuana (or a DWI).

 

 So what do these types of felonies and misdemeanors mean? Check out the next post to see!

 

 If you or someone you love has been charged with a crime, call The Cochran Firm-Dallas, P.L.L.C. We can help.

 

ed- especially if your bond (or the money you have to pay to be released) is set higher than you, or anybody, could reasonably pay.

 

Next, you need to figure out what you have been charged with. While you probably know the offense (what they arrested you for), it’s often trickier to know what kind of charge you’re facing- is it a misdemeanor or a felony?

 

The reason this can be tricky is because some offenses, like possession and DWI, can be either a misdemeanor or a felony. For instance, your third DWI charge is considered a felony, but the first two are misdemeanors. Possession of marijuana is another example- under 4 ounces is a misdemeanor, over 4 and it’s a felony.

 

In some counties like Dallas, it’s very easy to know which one you’re charged with. Your case number, which is listed on your bond papers and often on the contract with your attorney, will have either an “F” or an “M” in front- F for felony and M for misdemeanor.

 

If that number starts with an “M”, it’s often followed by either an “A”, “B”, or “C.” That second letter represents what is called the Misdemeanor Class. Class A is the most serious, and Class C is the least serious. Your first DWI charge is a Class B (MB), and your second is a Class A (MA). After that, it’s a felony. Going back to possession of marijuana- 2oz or less is a Class B offense, 2-4oz is a Class A. Anything over that is a felony.

 

Just like misdemeanors, there are different kinds of felonies. There are five types in Texas- State Jail, 3rd degree, 2nd degree, 1st degree, and Capital. State Jail is the least serious and Capital (usually reserved for very serious crimes like murder) is the most serious.

 

When we said a 3rd DWI offense was a felony, it is more specifically that 3rd degree type. Any DWI after that is also a 3rd degree felony. Back to the marijuana example- simple possession between 4oz and 5lbs is a State Jail offense, 5-50lbs is a 3rd degree, 50-2000 lbs is a 2nd degree, and over 2000lbs is a 1st degree felony. You can’t be charged with a capital felony for possession of marijuana (or a DWI).

 

So what do these types of felonies and misdemeanors mean? Check out the next post t see!

 

If you or someone you love has been charged with a crime, call The Cochran Firm-Dallas, P.L.L.C. We can help.

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The Cochran Firm handles Civil Litigation and Criminal Defense claims for clients throughout the United States of America. The information on this website does not constitute legal advice nor form an attorney-client relationship.Please contact The Cochran Firm today to schedule a free consultation.

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